Face in the Crowd -Alex Prager
Posed to look candid, Prager’s series of “crowd shots” were in fact elaborately orchestrated on a Hollywood sound stage, and each participant’s movements and appearance were meticulously directed. The realization of how intensively these shots have been staged is frightening, as Prager deprives us of a choice we are usually able to make in viewing photography: the subconscious organization of a hierarchy of moments. Nothing in Prager’s images can be overlooked; she positions every hair, every gesture, and every moment to seem not real but realistic.

Face in the Crowd -Alex Prager

Posed to look candid, Prager’s series of “crowd shots” were in fact elaborately orchestrated on a Hollywood sound stage, and each participant’s movements and appearance were meticulously directed. The realization of how intensively these shots have been staged is frightening, as Prager deprives us of a choice we are usually able to make in viewing photography: the subconscious organization of a hierarchy of moments. Nothing in Prager’s images can be overlooked; she positions every hair, every gesture, and every moment to seem not real but realistic.

Metamorphosis

Nothing retains its form; new shapes from old. Nature, the great inventor, ceaselessly contrives. In all creation, be assured, there is no death—no death, but only change and innovation; what we people call birth is but a different new beginning; death is but to cease to be the same. Perhaps this may have moved to that and that to this, yet still the sum of things remains the same.

Norman Rockwell - The Gossips [1948] 
The Gossips is the culmination of Rockwell’s fascination with the subject of gossip - while he had painted works exploring this theme in the past, it was not until his immersion in the Arlington community that the final composition came to fruition. In the present work, Rockwell depicts 15 figures, each portrayed twice, as part of a chain receiving and passing on a tidbit of gossip. The attention he pays to naturalistic detail in these expressive portraits is exceptional, and the artist ultimately conveys a sense of the personality and character of each figure.

Norman Rockwell - The Gossips [1948] 

The Gossips is the culmination of Rockwell’s fascination with the subject of gossip - while he had painted works exploring this theme in the past, it was not until his immersion in the Arlington community that the final composition came to fruition. In the present work, Rockwell depicts 15 figures, each portrayed twice, as part of a chain receiving and passing on a tidbit of gossip. The attention he pays to naturalistic detail in these expressive portraits is exceptional, and the artist ultimately conveys a sense of the personality and character of each figure.


(via androphilia)

You think you’re thinking, but you’re actually listening.

Terence McKenna